Category Archives: Research

Making shapes

 

A friend sent the above video with the following comment, I thought I share it with all.

“I have been thinking… after watching this TED talk [see above].

It explains how very complex and beautiful forms can be made by a series of very simple rules (in the case of this talk its folding ratios) repeating many times (like fractals). There is the obvious comparison to nature here, where the simple rule can be cell division for example and the beautiful complex form could be a living organism.

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Darul Amaan

MKA Research Association Annual Conference 2012

Report by Tauseef Ahmad Khan

The Annual MKA Research Association Conference 2012 was held at Darul Amaan Mosque, Manchester on Friday 24th, Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th August 2012.

A total of 30 young enthusiastic Khuddam and 2 Atfal attended the conference [corrected the number of Atfal]. Seventeen Khuddam and two Atfal travelled from London to attend the conference, while one Khadim came from Netherlands to take part in this conference. Continue reading

Shroud of Turin – Fake or Not

By Arif Khan

A few news articles on the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin again appeared in the news a few days back (see the end). Arif Khan, a good friend who has written many articles on Should of Turin has most kindly submitted the following on request.

Was the Shroud not Proved Fake in 1988 by Carbon Dating?

Dating of a sample, performed independently by 3 laboratories did return dates ranging from 1260-1390 in 1988, and yet the controversy rages on. The biggest issue was that the dating lead to more questions than it answered. How did the image form? Who formed the image and why?

Recent research, from 2005, by the late Raymond Rogers showed strong evidence to support the idea that the section that was used to cabron date the Shroud of Turin was from re-woven section. This effectively rendered the carbon dating result irrelevant for dating the cloth. Continue reading

Archaeology and the Qur’an – A brief introduction

The field of archaeology exists to understand human development and history through our material remains. At times the archaeologist resembles the role of a detective, piecing together the story, the motive, the purpose behind why a particular piece of pottery or stone or bone or whatever it may be was found where it was, when it was, how it was etc. I recall once participating in an excavation in the remote island of Islay in western Scotland, ploughing my way through layer after layer of thick, sludgy, slimy silt in freezing temperatures with my knee deep in mud, increasingly torrential rainfall and rapidly losing the will to live, only to seemingly find nothing. It turned out the post-excavation process of flotation, sieving and sorting had unearthed a microscopic charred seed remain which, when radiocarbon dated, brought back the date of this particular site to over 1000 years than had previously been estimated, consequently causing a re-evaluation of the entire site. The clues are  often subtle, but nonetheless they remain evident.

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What’s the best age to win a Nobel Prize?

What's the best age to win a Nobel Prize? By  an article from ars technica

When you think of a prize-winning scientist, do you picture a young genius bursting with creativity and new ideas, or an older, more seasoned researcher that has been slaving away at the bench for decades? It turns out both images are pretty accurate. According to a recent paper in PNAS, the average age at which scientists complete Nobel Prize-winning work has varied greatly over the history of the prize, depending on the era and the scientific field.

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Human cell becomes living laser

laser cell

[This article is from Nature News]

Jellyfish protein amplifies light in first biological laser.

by Zoë Corbyn

Microscope image of a living laser in action. Due to the irregular internal structure of the cell, the laser spot has an apparently random pattern.Malte Gather

Scientists have for the first time created laser light using living biological material: a single human cell and some jellyfish protein.

“Lasers started from physics and are viewed as engineering devices,” says Seok-Hyun Yun, an optical physicist at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who created the ‘living laser’ with his colleague Malte Gather. “This is the first time that we have used biological materials to build a laser and generate light from something that is living.” The finding is reported today in Nature Photonics 1.

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MKA RA Research Conference 2011 Part 2

“Creativity is intelligence having fun.” [Albert Einstein]

Day 2

Its 0300 and I have woken up, whilst everyone around me is fast asleep. I walk out of our dormitory and walk into the conference room, trying to somehow side-step the creaking wooden floor beneath me. I stop and listen. Pin drop silence. It’s still pretty warm in this summer’s night. I decide, it’s best if I say thanks to Allah and accordingly offer tahajjud prayers, whilst I await the tired delegates to wake up for Fajr.

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The Wonder of Electricity

Can you imagine? Knowing nothing of artificial light. Your days being lit by the sun and the night by candle light? What a terrifying shock it would have been to observe the blinding light from a electric spark? The wonder of electricity, from creating light to moving the dead, electricity must have been incredibly frightening.

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MKA RA Research Conference 2011 Part 1

An Account of an Ahmadi Researcher to the Greatest Conference ever!

I sat there at the edge of the room, taking it all in, this was the calm before the storm.
It is 0930, on Saturday 2nd July, with a bright blue sky outside, promising uninterrupted sunshine induced with summer country air and all those “refreshing” aromas surrounding it… we are waiting. Continue reading